How to work with limiting career beliefs

6 Tips How to Work with Limiting Career Beliefs

Psychological attitudes live in every person, but they do not always interfere with achieving the desired results. The same belief may in one case be an obstacle and in another a normal accompanying attitude.

For example, the statement: “I’m not cooking well.” If the client is not going to become a chef at the same time and his goal for the session is in no way connected with this area, then there is no need to spend time and energy of the client to fight this conviction.

I will describe a step-by-step algorithm for working with limiting beliefs.

1. Identification of beliefs

  • The consultant with the help of clarifying questions (the GROW technique helps well) removes all the obstacles that impede the start of changes, the start of some kind of activity.
  • We identify the strongest fear – the strongest obstacle and find in it a limiting belief. This can be done by asking the client a question: “What is the worst thing that can happen if you imagine that fear has come true?”
  • Answering this question, the client gives out his limiting belief.

2. Assessment of persuasion

The consultant asks the client to evaluate the conviction from different angles.

First, we analyze the “pluses” of the installation:

  • What good is your life from having this installation? In what situations does this belief help you when it works “for you”?
  • If the client cannot clearly answer what are the advantages, the consultant finds out what the hidden benefit may be. Is there any other way to get this benefit?
  • What does this belief protect you from?

Next, we evaluate the “minuses” of belief:

  • What is negative in your life from the presence of this installation?
  • In what situations do you feel that it slows you down?

3. Reconciliation with a view

The consultant clarifies with the client whether this belief hinders the achievement of the goal.

  • What will happen if we continue to think so?
  • In what cases does this belief limit you?
  • What consequences?
  • How it affects your goal now

An important point:  if the limiting belief about work does not interfere with the achievement of the client’s goal, then the consultant decides with the client whether to continue working with this installation.

4. Consideration of an alternative

At this stage, the client is invited to go beyond the scope of his installation and look at the situation broader in order to form the “ground” for a new belief.

  • How could the situation be interpreted differently? What is the worst thing that can happen to you in this situation?
  • If sometimes you act differently, what will change? What can this lead to? Describe the situation.
  • Were there situations when you acted differently and this experience was positive? If not, imagine a situation that this belief did not work: how could it be?
  • If this cannot be changed, then what can be?

5. Formation of a new installation

Having prepared the client at the previous stage, the consultant can help him form a new supporting thought.

  • How could a thought or explanation of a situation sound different?
  • What would you like to preserve from the old belief and what could you add to the new?
  • What is the most comfortable wording for you at the moment?
  • What will happen when this belief changes? How will it look like?
  • What resources can help you with this?
  • What do you want to do in this regard?

6. Maintenance effect

To give the new installation energy and prevent the client from “rolling back”, there is a variant of the supporting strategy

  • What will help you, what are the steps for this new installation to take root?
  • What will you do if you notice a manifestation of an old belief?
  • What actions do you need to refuse in order for the new installation to consolidate?

This set of support will give the client confidence and an action plan in case of a return to old negative beliefs.

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